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freeclass2Enrollment Open: Open Enrollment for 2018 has begun. The next class for 2017 is January 8, 2018.  Please contact our admissions team soon to secure your enrollment and start the application process.  We have a wonderful team waiting to assist you from registration to graduation. 

To get started, visit our Admissions Page.  CCR starts a new theory class every 5 weeks.  For 2018, you can start on January 8, 2018, February 19, 2018, April 2, 2018, and May 14, 2018.

freeclass2Free Discover Steno Course: They're called court reporters, stenographers, captioners, speed-texters, realtime communication specialists, and IVT technicians (instant voice-to-text).  Whatever you call them, they are technology!  Picture yourself getting paid to caption the games of your favorite baseball team.  Find yourself in the center of the action during the high-profile trial. #FreeClass #PlusOne #iheartccr #discoversteno

CCR will be hosting a free course called Discover Steno A to Z, An Introduction to Machine Shorthand Steno later this fall in an online format. This eight-week course will cover the importance of court reporting and realtime professions, the history of court reporting, the value of skill and academic courses, the career paths, and the tools for success.  If you would like to be considered for enrollment in this free course and have a member of our team contact you, please complete following link:  Free Course Signup

 

Philosophy and Approach - Since 1984, College of Court Reporting has been providing students with state-of-the-art technology, one of a kind curriculum, and award-winning faculty. College of Court Reporting offers:

  • a progressive, student-centered college with a reputation as a leader in online court reporting education.
  • the first online court reporting program approved by the National Court Reporters Association.
  • the first of its kind 1-minute approach to testing and evaluating student progress.
  • implemented technologies to further assist faculty in educating, coaching, and mentoring students.


ev360 Technologies -
ev360 assists our faculty and staff in enhancing their approach to teaching and delivering a proven curriculum and method of court reporting instruction.  The proof is in the numbers with the ev360 Success As You Progress (SAP) philosophy and approach to testing.

Pre-ev360 (old approach):

  • students passed 5-minute tests 22.5 percent of the time.
  • technology prevented students from progressing at their own rate.  
  • grading of submitted tests took approximately two weeks with little or no faculty feedback.

 

Post-ev360 (new approach after 12 months):

  • students passed 5-minute evaluations 41.8 percent of the time.
  • students passed 1- to 5-minute evaluations 51.6 percent of the time.
  • students received 91 percent accuracy with over 65 percent of all 5-minute evaluations.
  • students received interactive audio feedback within 24 to 48 hours on all submitted evaluations.

 

 

EV360 Realtime Theory - The basic principles of the the EV360 Realtime Theory are:

  • incorporating the basic principles of learning: The Three Rs of Machine Shorthand – Reading, wRiting, and Repetition.
  • based on the fundamental machine shorthand theory developed by Ward Stone Ireland in the late 1800s.
  • updated theory principles that incorporate the latest artificial-intelligence technology for realtime writing.
  • learning machine shorthand and developing the skill and proficiency to write rapidly with a high degree of accuracy.

 

 

Why is accreditation important? Although graduating from an accredited program does not guarantee jobs or licensure for individuals, it may facilitate such achievement. It reflects the quality by which an educational institution or a program conducts its business. It speaks to a sense of public trust, as well as to professional quality. As a student, accreditation provides assurance that the program in which you are enrolled or are considering enrolling is engaged in continuous review and improvement of its quality, that it meets nationally endorsed standards in the profession, and that it is accountable for achieving what it sets out to do.

Accreditation is an important credential to look for when choosing a college. If you have credits to transfer from another accredited institution, you will want to make sure both schools have accreditation that allows you to transfer credits back and forth. Accreditation is also important for your degree to be widely recognized by employers and professional associations. Accreditation is an assurance to students and the public that an institution meets or exceeds standards for quality of faculty, curriculum, learner services, and fiscal stability. To learn more about the value of accreditation, click here.

 

accrediations
College of Court Reporting was granted authorization by the Indiana Board for Proprietary Education (BPE) on January 1, 1985. It was granted approval by the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) November 1, 1987. It was granted accreditation by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools to award Diplomas, Certificates, and Occupational Associate Degrees. September 1989. The court reporting program was granted approval by ACICS May 23, 2001 to be delivered through distance education. Website: http://www.in.gov/cpe/index.htm

 

Distance Education Accrediting Commission - College of Court Reporting currently has an in-process application for accreditation with the Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC). The Accrediting Commission is listed by the U.S. Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency and is a recognized member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.  The Accrediting Commission is a charter member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), the leading non-governmental recognition for accrediting associations. A national advocate and institutional voice for self-regulation of academic quality through accreditation, CHEA is an association of 3,000 degree-granting colleges and universities and recognizes 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting organizations.  Distance Education Accrediting Commission contact information: 1101 17th Street NW, Suite 808, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 234- 5100  Website: http://www.deac.org

 

National Court Reporters Association - College of Court Reporting, Inc. is certified by and has met the General Requirements and Minimum Standards established by the Council on Approved Student Education of the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA). NCRA is not an accrediting agency, but most NCRA-approved programs are accredited by agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. NCRA contact information: 8224 Old Courthouse Road, Vienna, VA 22183-3808, Telephone: (800) 272-6272, Website: http://www.ncraonline.org

 

National Verbatim Reporters Association - College of Court Reporting is an affilliate of the National Verbatim Reporters Association (NVRA).  Founded in 1967, NVRA is the only national professional organization dedicated to the practice of voice writing, offering support and benefits to its members, certification, conferences, and newsletters.  NVRA offers several levels of membership. Court reporters using either voice or stenographic methods may become general members of NVRA. Contact information: 629 North Main Street Hattiesburg, MS 39401, Telephone: (601) 582-4345, Website: http://www.nvra.org

 

NC-SARA Approved Institution - National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements - College of Court Reporting participates in the National Council for State Authorization for reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) and is authorized under SARA (State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement) to offer programs in member states that have agreed to adhere to comparable national standards for interstate offerings of postsecondary distance education courses and programs. This reciprocity process among member states endeavors to ensure high quality standards in relation to state authorization for distance learning. SARA is overseen by a National Council and administered by four regional compacts.

 

The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools - The stated mission of ACICS is to advance educational excellence at independent, nonpublic career schools, colleges, and organizations in the United States and abroad. This is achieved through a deliberate and thorough accreditation process of quality assessment and enhancement as well as ethical business and educational practices whereby ACICS attempts to maintain minimum standards, policies, and procedures leading to institutional effectiveness. ACICS contact information: 750 First Street, NE, Suite 908, Washington, DC 2002-4241, Telephone: (202) 336-6780, Website:  http: www.acics.org

In December of 2016, ACICS lost its federal recognition from the United States Department of Education.  Even though CCR is accredited by ACICS through December of 2019, it is currently seeking a new accreditor as referenced above.  One of the requirements as we seek new accreditation from a DOE recognized body is to post the following information:

(i) that the Institution’s accrediting agency is no longer recognized by the Department;
(ii) that the Institution has 18 months following the loss of its Department-recognized accrediting agency, to find a new accrediting agency to maintain eligibility to receive funds under Title IV, HEA programs, and that if the Institution does not obtain accreditation within that 18 month period, which is June 12, 2018, the Institution would no longer be eligible to receive funds under Title IV, HEA programs;
(iii) the date of the expiration of the 18 month period referred to in (ii);
(iv) that any student at the Institution who has a complaint relating to Title IV eligibility or administration, the quality of education received at the Institution, or otherwise relating to the accreditation standards of its former accrediting agency can submit that complaint to the Institution and/or to any of the following: the Department’s Student Complaint website, the State authorizing authority, the State Office of Attorney General, the State Office of Consumer Affairs; and
(v) the mail or e-mail addresses for the parties identified in (iv).  All pertinent contact information for this item is referenced on this page: http:  www.acics.org.


 

The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools - The stated mission of ACICS is to advance educational excellence at independent, nonpublic career schools, colleges, and organizations in the United States and abroad. This is achieved through a deliberate and thorough accreditation process of quality assessment and enhancement as well as ethical business and educational practices whereby ACICS attempts to maintain minimum standards, policies, and procedures leading to institutional effectiveness. ACICS contact information: 750 First Street, NE, Suite 908, Washington, DC 2002-4241, Telephone: (202) 336-6780, Website: http://www.acics.org

 

 

 

Mission

The mission of the College of Court Reporting is to provide state-of-the-art instructional systems technologies and quality teaching techniques to educate students in the fields of realtime captioning and court reporting in an online environment. The College of Court Reporting is committed to providing a quality education to students that meet or exceed the standards of the National Court Reporters Association and the National Verbatim Reporters Association.

To fulfill this mission…
The college believes in directing its efforts toward creating an educational environment providing the learning experiences necessary to enter the workplace. Courses of study are reviewed, revised, and added when needed. Students are given hands-on experience in realtime computer-aided transcription and computer applications for the court reporter, captioner, and communication access realtime translation (CART) provider.

The entire staff recognizes the responsibility of encouraging each student to succeed academically and to grow professionally to meet the challenging and changing needs of realtime technology, court reporting, and realtime reporting for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals.

The college strives to improve its programs with the latest information technologies such as computerized realtime transcription for broadcast captioning and CART reporting and online distance education classes in court reporting.

Objectives

The objective of the college is to provide its students with educational opportunities in all fields relating to court reporting and realtime technology. The College of Court Reporting accomplishes this objective in the following manner:eporting and realtime technology or entry-level positions as an administrative assistant. The College of Court Reporting accomplishes this objective in the following manner:

  • An intensive curriculum is offered as required by the National Court Reporters Association to train future realtime court reporters. The full court reporting curriculum is offered online over the Internet.
  • An Associate of Applied Science degree for court reporting is offered by meeting the requirements of the Indiana Board for Proprietary Education.
  • An environment is present whereby all students are given hands-on experience before entering the marketplace.
  • Faculty are employed with qualifications and work experience necessary to teach. In addition to many possessing a bachelor’s degree or higher, most instructors possess court reporting certification: Registered Professional Reporter (RPR), Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR), or Certified Reporting Instructor (CRI) of the National Court Reporters Association. Certified instructors earn college and continuing education credits whenever possible.
  • Students are encouraged to attain and maintain the highest possible standards in their professional, academic, and private affairs. They are encouraged and prepared to attain court reporting certification (CSR or RPR), even though certification is not required by the State of Indiana for employment as a court reporter.
  • Students are encouraged to continue their education and training beyond school by taking college courses and joining professional organizations, such as the National Court Reporters Association, Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association, Illinois Court Reporters Association, or their respective state court reporting associations. They are encouraged to attend seminars and conventions and engage in a variety of continuing education opportunities.
 

Is CCR NCRA Approved and Nationally Accredited?

CCR is approved by the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA).  CCR has been approvied by NCRA since 1987 and was the first online program approved by the NCRA.

CCR is applying for accreditation with the Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC). The Accrediting Commission is listed by the U.S. Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency and is a recognized member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. 

CCR is accredited with the Indiana Board for Proprietary Education (BPE) since 1985.

CCR is currently accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) to award Associate Degrees and Diplomas in 1989. Our online court reporting program was given a grant of accreditation by ACICS May 23, 2001.

Can I transfer courses for credit?

CCR's transfer policy is in accordance with accreditation policy for transfer credit. Transfer consideration will be given consideration based on an evaluation of official transcripts, grades and credits earned, and relevance of courses to CCR courses. Please note that time to complete the program is not dependent on how many credits are transferred or on full- or part-time status. It is dependent on how quickly one develops the skill and accuracy and completion of all course and graduation requirements.

What theory do you teach?

The College of Court Reporting uses the EV360  Realtime Theory. If your already know a different theory and are considering transferring to CCR, you do not need to learn the EV360 Realtime Theory.  Our academic courses and skill development courses are not specific to any one theory.  The EV360 Realtime Theory is a simple and logical theory, written by educators, that incorporates speedbuilding during the first couple weeks of a students’ first semester. When this theory was developed, the educators only had the students’ best interests in mind. They made the rules of writing easy to understand – rules that don’t require hours of analyzing and memorizing!

By the end of Theory 1, students learn how to write every English word with a strong foundation of the basic theory. During their second semester, conflict resolution is introduced. Since students do not have to resolve conflict in Theory 1 and are able to focus only on learning the basic theory; therefore, it is easy for them to make minor changes to groups of words with conflict. Since CCR has taught the EV360 Realtime Theory, students enter their first semester of speedbuilding writing on an average of 80 words per minute. This is 20-40 words per minute faster than they were writing with the Phoenix theory CCR taught before developing the EV360.

Instructor, Alice Skoro CRI "The EV360 Realtime Theory provides students with an incredible tool. Presented in a systematic fashion, each lesson incorporates review, drills, proper names, briefs, and speedbuilding along with the introduction of new concepts. After 15 weeks, our students know how to write any English word. Conflict resolution and beginning speedbuilding can then begin with their second semester. Students are not burdened by intense analysis of each word. Instead, they can learn to write with minimal hesitation to facilitate speedbuilding. Successful students equal successful reporters!"

Instructor, Jami Naughgle CRI "The EV360 Realtime Theory was developed by experienced educators who are true pioneers in court reporting education. The theory concepts are logical, and the textbooks are set up for ease in learning and retaining the material. The EV360 Realtime Theory also incorporates the latest technology that uses artificial intelligence. After just the first semester, the students leave theory knowing how to write literary, jury charge, and two-voice testimony. The students have a strong writing vocabulary and a solid foundation for building speed."

How do the online classes work?

Students meet LIVE classes weekly with an instructor and fellow classmates. Academic classes typically consist of one weekly LIVE class. Theory classes consist of one LIVE class each week with an opportunity to attend live or listen to recordings daily. Speedbuilding classes consist of one LIVE class per week. Each LIVE class lasts approximately 1 hour in which students are interacting live with an instructor. Speedbuilding students also have the opportunity to attend up to an additional 18 hours of live or recorded classes weekly. Each week students need 3-4 hours, 6-7 days per week for machine work, with classes included in the minimum requirement of 18 machine hours per week.

Sample schedule: Wednesday, Theory, from 7:00-8:00 p.m. Central time. Wednesday, keyboarding, from 8:45-9:45 p.m. Central time. Monday, English, from 8:00-9:00 p.m. Central time. Students must be available Monday-Thursday after 7 p.m. central time.

How much is the tuition?

We charge by the credit hour. All of our machine shorthand classes are six credit hours, our academics are three credit hours, and internships are one credit hour. We charge $375 per credit hour for online students and $225 per credit hour for onground students.  A monthly payment plan may be arranged whenever necessary. There is no service charge if tuition is paid monthly. A late charge may be assessed when payment is made past the due date. Visa, MasterCard, and Discover may be used for all payments. Financial Aid is also available to those who qualify.

We participate in the Federal Pell Grant and student loan programs. Our school code is 026158. Our financial aid officer would be happy to assist you in what you are eligible for in terms of aid.

If you have further financial aid questions, please contact 866-294-3974 ext. 223 in our financial aid team.

What is the weekly time commitment?

A student is expected to spend between three and four hours per week for each credit earned for an academic or a speedbuilding course. It is recommended that the court reporting student plans to practice computerized machine shorthand 18 hours each week (three hours per day, six to seven days per week) in order to learn machine shorthand and develop the skill, speed, and realtime proficiency needed to complete the program within the maximum time frame.

Does CCR sell the equipment?

The College of Court Reporting does not sell, rent, or lease machines or software. It is the student's responsibility to purchase equipment. To see a list of vendors who rent equipment or allow payment clicks, click the following link: Equipment Rental and Software Payment Plans.  

How long is the program?

In answering this question it is important to understand a few terms when we discuss program length.  As an accredited college, we are required to state what the minimum and maximum time frames are for each accredited program.  The stated time frame, or program length, is different for each of accredited program.  The definition of the minimum time frame is the period of time we are required to offer the entire program's curriculum.  If the minimum time frame is 28 months, we are required to offer each course in the program within 28 months.  A student has an opportunity to complete the program in 28 months if they progress at a regular rate, do not repeat any courses, and are enrolled full time (12 credits) each semester. The definition of the maximum time frame is the period of time a student is allowed to be enrolled in a program and earn the academic credential for that program.  If the maximum time frame is 44 months, the student must complete all required course work within 44 months.  Can a student attend beyond 44 months of enrollment?  Yes, but they cannot receive the program's academic credential such as a diploma, certificate, or degree.  They will receive an official academic record indicating all completed course work.

Now, stating that our minimum and maximum time frames are 28/44 months for our associate degree court reporting program does not mean that a student will complete the program in 28 or 44 months.  It is important to understand that court reporting programs consist of academic course work and skill development course work.  The skill development component is where program completion times vary from student to student.  Every student learns, develops, and progresses with their skill at different rates.  Please speak with our administrative staff regarding the average completion time for our students who complete their respective programs.

How much can I borrow in student loans?

A first year dependent student can borrow up to $5,500; and second year dependent student can borrow up to $6,500; and a third year student can borrow up to $7,500. The aggregate loan limit for a dependent student is $31,000. A first-year independent student can borrow up to $9,500 for the first two semesters; a second-year independent student may borrow up to $10,500; and a third year independent student can borrow up to $12,500. The aggregate limit for independent undergraduate students is $57,500.

Does CCR offer job placement?

CCR has a full-time Director of Alumni & Employer Relations who works with both students about to graduate and those that have already graduated on finding positions both locally and across the United States in their desired court reporting or captioning field.  Although CCR cannot guarantee job placement, we do work very hard to make sure graduates are provided all the tools they need to succeed in their job search, including a stellar resume, a persuasive cover letter, and top-notch interviewing skills.  Additionally, graduates are sent job opportunities almost every week through a Job Drawer email, and CCR contacts employers regularly to discuss open positions.  Networking is such an important part of the job search that students are encouraged from the beginning of their education to join their state and national court reporting associations as well as to engage the professionals they meet during their internship since many internships lead to employment.  All of these services are provided to a CCR graduate for a lifetime!

What is a mentor?

A mentor acts as a proctor of dictation tests at various speed building levels. CCR will provide testing materials to your mentor when you are ready to move into the next speed building level. Arrangements will be made between you and your mentor for this testing. It should take no longer than a couple of hours, and it will give you the vital opportunity to connect with a professional in the field of court reporting. Hopefully, this relationship will be dynamic in that your mentor will be your friend, coach, and support system. Ultimately, your mentor could assist in your placement into an internship or employment opportunity. Click the following link for more information about the program: Mentor Program Information

What type of operating system should I be using?

Students should plan on using a Windows operating system. Currently, our EV360 technologies do not fully support other operating systems such as Apple's OS or Linux.

What type of students attend CCR?

Our future court reporters are very self-motivated and self-disciplined. They have good English and grammar skills and are detail oriented. Those who attend CCR must be willing and able to devote 18-20 hours per week on their steno machines.

What sets CCR apart from other court reporting schools schools?

CCR has a rich history, philosophy, and reputation. CCR has been in teaching court reporting for over 35 years. It started with the simple philosophy of providing students with the best faculty, resources, curriculum, and educational program possible. This philosophy was the brainchild of its founder, who first and foremost is an educator, not a business person. CCR has always been about educating students, not making profits. This is still today the guiding principle of our approach to those seeking a quality education to enter the careers of the court reporting profession. We take a family approach to working together where each student's success is every individual on our staff's success.

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Founder - Kay MoodyClasses began at the College of Court Reporting in September 1984. The college was granted authorization by the Indiana Board for Proprietary Education (BPE) on January 1, 1985. It was granted approval to award an Associate of Applied Science degree in Court Reporting by the same board on August 14, 1985. The school was incorporated by the State of Indiana September 3, 1985.  Kay Moody is founder; Jeff Moody, the corporation president and owner.

The College of Court Reporting was granted approval for the day program by the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) November 1, 1987, and became NCRA’s first online certified program in the spring of 2006. The college is also a member in good standing with the Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association (ISRA).

The College of Court Reporting first became accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) to award Certificates and Occupational Associate Degrees in  September 1989. The court reporting program was granted approval by ACICS May 23, 2001, to be delivered through online distance education. ACICS is identified as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the U.S. Department of Education under the provisions of Public Law 82-550 and subsequent legislation, which requires the evaluation of such agencies and issuance of an official list by the Department. The college is approved by the U.S. Department of Education to offer Stafford Loans (GSL), Pell Grants, and Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) for those who qualify.

The career of judicial court reporter is as rewarding as it is demanding. Court reporters are responsible for a verbatim record of many different types of proceedings, including trials, depositions, and government hearings. The judicial court reporting educational program is organized to educate students for realtime judicial court reporting careers.  CCR students learn a realtime translation theory and software that is suitable for broadcast captioning and CART, and they have the foundation to continue in these exciting careers with additional training.

The recommended courses of study outlined in this bulletin are designed to help students develop the skills and acquire the professional knowledge required of the competent and skilled technician in a variety of fields. Students who complete these programs develop skill and accuracy in keyboarding, computerized machine shorthand technology, office procedures, computers and word processing, medical transcription, and court reporting procedures.

The application of court reporting skills and technology may be used to assist those who are deaf and hard-of-hearing. Students may receive a certificate in voice captioning in four semesters, a diploma in court reporting in five semesters, and/or an associate degree in court reporting in seven semesters.

 

 

College of Court Reporting Graduates Earn Certification

5/20/12

Hobart, IN---The College of Court Reporting is proud to announce that three of our recent graduates have passed either their state or national certification exam. Trixie Schuzer and Christie Leatiota passed their respective state certification while Kelly Olhausen obtained national certification. Both certifications require rigorous training and intense focus due to the fast-paced dictation that makes up the skill portion of the exams.

In addition to developing incredible speed and accuracy on a computerized stenography machine, these students have excelled in academic subjects as well. The Written Knowledge Test that is included in these exams requires a great deal of knowledge in the area of Standard English grammar and punctuation, medical and legal terminology, and courtroom practicum. As a result of their education and skill, they are now capable of working in a variety of fields such as official reporting in proceedings in state and Federal court, Broadcast television captioning, educational reporting for the deaf and hard -of- hearing, and freelance reporting for attorneys.

Ms. Schuzer, now a Certified Shorthand Reporter, is eligible for court reporting positions in Illinois. She is a Winter 2012 graduate of the College of Court Reporting, attending both onsite and online classes. Mrs. Leatiota obtained her CSR title in the state of Washington. She hopes to follow in the footsteps of her mother, who is a working official reporter. Mrs. Olhausen transferred to CCR during the Summer 2011 semester. She proceeded to increase her writing speed from 120 words per minute to the graduation standard of 225 words per minute in less than a year with CCR. Mrs. Olhausen is now seeking the Arizona state certification as well.

These students have demonstrated a tremendous amount of dedication throughout their studies. They have transcribed countless mock trials and speed evaluations; they have contributed in many discussions in their LIVE virtual classes; and they have completed each task thrown at them with an attitude and composure that speak of great professionalism. Congratulations and good luck to these students as they enter their professional career.

The College of Court Reporting was the first online program in the country to be certified by the National Court Reporters Association. In December of 2003, CCR was one of five schools chosen throughout the entire United States from among all colleges and universities to participate in the U.S. Department of Education's Distance Education Demonstration Program. For more information on furthering your education, contact Nicky at 866-294-3974.

 

Pam Dixon Obtains National Certification

6/30/12

Pamela V. Dixon, a recent graduate of the College of Court Reporting, passed the national certification exam and earned her Registered Professional Reporter certification. Though earning this certification demands an incredible amount of preparation and focus, Pam met the challenge with a positive attitude and diligent practice.

In addition to developing incredible speed and accuracy on a computerized stenography machine, Ms. Dixon excelled in academic subjects as well. The written knowledge portion of the certification testing requires a great deal of knowledge in the area of standard English grammar and punctuation, medical and legal terminologies, and courtroom practicum. As a result of her education and skill, she is now capable of working in a variety of fields such as legal reporting in state and federal courts, freelance deposition reporting, broadcast television captioning, entertainment reporting, business reporting, and educational reporting for the deaf and hard -of- hearing.

Ms. Dixon, now a Registered Professional Reporter as of May 2012, started with CCR in October 2011 as an online student, after having worked as a Marine Corps court reporter. She graduated in the Winter of 2012 and is currently focusing on passing the English portion of the California CSR. She has already passed both the skills portion and the professional writing portion of the exam.

Ms. Dixon demonstrated a tremendous amount of dedication throughout her studies. She transcribed countless mock trials and speed evaluations, she contributed to many discussions in her LIVE virtual classes, and she is now ready to begin a new chapter of her life. Congratulations and good luck to Ms. Dixon as she enters her professional career.

The College of Court Reporting was the first online program in the country to be certified by the National Court Reporters Association. In December of 2003, CCR was one of five schools chosen throughout the entire United States from among all colleges and universities to participate in the U.S. Department of Education's Distance Education Demonstration Program.

Join the leader in online court reporting today and write your own future!

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Need a Reporter?

Employers, are you looking for reporters?

Natalie Kijurna, our Graduate & Employer Relations Coordinator, is happy to assist you with a job posting or searching for candidates that fit your employment needs.

Email: natalie.kijurna@ccr.edu
Phone: 866-294-3974 Ext: 229

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Online Distance Learning

It used to be that the only way to earn your degree and become a court reporter, captioner, or CART reporter was to spend hours sitting in a traditional classroom. But things have changed, and the College of Court Reporting is delivering the classroom over the Internet, directly to you, wherever and whenever you want. Whether for love of learning, career advancement, or personal satisfaction, you can earn your associate degree through CCR's fully accredited online court reporting program.  CCR is approved by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) to offer its entire court reporting program through distance learning via the Internet. We received our approval on May 23, 2001.  Learn More...

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