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CCR STUDENT WINS THE INDIANA SHORTHAND REPORTERS ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP!

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The Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association (now the Indiana Court Reporters Association) held its annual scholarship competition. Participants were asked to write an essay about why electronic means of recording are not a suitable replacement for court reporters. ISRA has announced the winner! Congratulations to Jessica Frizzell, court reporting student at College of Court Reporting, on submitting the winning essay. 

 

Her essay is reprinted as follows:

 

For years, rumors of electronic recorders serving as replacements for court reporters have been swirling around the nation. Court reporters and court reporting students are often asked, “Why are court reporters needed when we have technology like Siri and other voice recording software?” The intense accuracy that is needed to record official transcripts cannot be provided by using such recorders. Although electronic recording devices are becoming more and more prevalent, their use as a method of transcription will not replace court reporters in the future because there are too many possibilities of error.

           

If electronic methods of transcription were to be used in a courtroom, there are countless potential complications or chances of electronic failure. There are many risks of error, such as the recorder not being started, the recorder malfunctioning during the testimony, or electronic files becoming corrupted or even deleted. Also, sound quality is a key factor when such recording devices are used. While a court reporter has the capability to manually identify various speakers in a courtroom, these devices do not have such dexterity. Furthermore, there is always a chance that vital testimony may be masked in a recording by various sounds in the courtroom, such as someone coughing, doors shutting, or chairs knocking on the floor. All of these factors are just a few examples of why court reporters will still be needed in the future.

           

Overall, the idea of using electronic recording devices as replacements for court reporters may seem like a logical transition, but in reality, court reporters will still be needed for many years to come. Despite their growing population in today’s world of technology, electronic methods of transcription will not replace court reporters in the future because the chance of potential errors cannot be afforded. The official record is too fragile to risk the chance of inaccuracies. Court reporters will continue to be needed because of their proficiency and ability to provide a clean and accurate record, despite the challenges presented in a courtroom.

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Guest Wednesday, 01 April 2020

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